7 Easy Ways to Expose Your Website to Hackers

Home / Web Security Tips / 7 Easy Ways to Expose Your Website to Hackers

So you want to serve up your website for any hacker to break into. Sure, I guess…who am I to judge?

Here are 7 Things You Should Not Do Unless You Want Your Website Hacked.

Once again, if you’re a sensible human being you really should never find yourself doing any of these things.

1. Ignore Security Updates

They may be a nuisance, but updates patch up newly discovered bugs in software. Not installing updates and patches makes it a lot easier for hackers to compromise your device or web app. If you want your website hacked, ignore all security patches, plugin updates, and updates for CMS services such as WordPress or Drupal.

2. Use as Many Different Features and Plugins On Your Site As Possible

Plugins introduce many new potential vulnerabilities to your website, similar to how adding more windows makes your submarine less seaworthy. Be sure to load up on file uploaders, video players, ad managers, analytics, and whatever else you can cram in, even if you don’t need any of it.

3. Set a Really Simple Password

Setting your password as something easy like “123456,” the always-clever “passw0rd,” or matching your password to your username saves hackers a lot of time. You can also help by using the same password for your computer, e-mail, FTP access, and Ashley Madison account, so that once one is compromised, all of them exposed.

Mouse cursor over security tab

Don’t neglect your security settings.

4. Mismanage Your Website and Its Contributors

Just let security be someone else’s job, and don’t take any notice. Be sure to give your employees or contributors full admin access to your website, and make sure not to update your passwords after they leave. Sooner or later, something bad will happen.

5. Don’t Put Together a Security Incident Response Plan

No need to prepare for the worst when you’re counting on it. What if your site gets disabled, or deleted, or information is leaked? How do you detect it, how do you respond, and how do you disclose it? Those are questions that should be considered by anyone who doesn’t want to get hacked.

6. Don’t Bother Securing Your Domain With SSL

SSL encrypts communication between a website’s server and a user’s browser, especially useful in protecting online transactions and payments. But it thwarts man-in-the-middle attacks in which a hacker gets between server and browser and can monitor or alter communication. So if you want to endanger your customers’ privacy, forget about HTTPS — HTTP is the way to go!

7. Don’t Use a Web Application Firewall

A web application firewall can protect your site against the worst online threats, including DDoS attack, SQL injection, and cross-site scripting (XSS), so if you want to make it easier for hackers to overrun your website, the last thing you should do is secure it with a web app firewall like Cloudbric, Imperva, or Cloudflare.

Related Posts